Mixing it up with Eggy Bread

Owing to a lovely gang of visitors yesterday, we’ve much food leftovers to get through. So we started with breakfast.  I’d bought lots of lovely bread in Lidl to go with all our salady bits, and so before I froze it the remainder for toast, I kept back a few slices for eggy bread.  It’s actually kinda brownish so I think it might be sourdough even though it said Country White on the basket label.

The recipe I was working off was for french toast but used great big slabs of bread, and a tablespoon of sugar.  I guess you could call what I made french toast but I think that might be giving it notions above its station – this, was eggy bread.  I had 4 not particularly thick slices set aside. In fact they were cut in the slice-a-nator machine in store, which has no less than 3 thickness settings so I happen to know these were 14mm slices!  Shame on you if you cannot recreate this perfection at home with your breadknife.

Mix 2 eggs, 100mls of milk, and 1 scant tsp of caster sugar.  Soak bread on both sides.  Fry up in a little butter on a non-stick pan.

Serve baby’s with natural yogurt, banana & finely chopped walnuts. Serve own the same, subbing maple syrup for yogurt.  Sneaky.

Sit back and gape in wonder at how much bread one small boy can fit in his mouth.

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Too sweet for a lunchbox treat

Yum, for mum.

As I type, I’ve 2 sets of fresh baked goods cooling in the kitchen.  Trail mix bars, and yogurt & raisin cupcakes.  Both are Annabel Karmel recipes.  Poor Dominic hasn’t been well the last couple of days and I thought I’d make a treat for him.  The trail mix bars I had admired when a colleague had them in work.  He admitted to me that his daughter (same age as Dom) wasn’t actually getting any, but that him and his wife love them.  I’m inclined to feel the same – there’s Cheerios in them, oft lauded as a good toddler snack, but I find them too sweet to eat for breakfast so if they’re too sweet for me, then they’re too sweet for Dominic.   I think I could probably find plain ones in a health food shop though, which would work.

There’s honey which I’m okay with now he’s 16 months, but then lots of added sugar also.  She also suggests salted peanuts and chocolate chips as an ingredient – I stuck to seeds & dried fruit.  Even with that, these ones are strictly for parents.  I’d love a nice muesli bar recipe that was a bit more genuinely toddler friendly – anyone know of any, with no cheerios or copious amounts of added sugar? They seem like they’d be good for his creche lunchbox, which might be getting a bit boring.

Secondly I have the yogurt & raisin cupcakes cooling.  Actually, I’m lying, I just tasted the model one from the photo, it’s cool and it’s flippin lovely.  They’re from the Complete Baby & Toddler Meal Planner, but I can’t find the full recipe online.  They have ground almonds which I love for keeping cakes moist, and 150ml of natural yogurt.  These are relatively plain and don’t taste over sweet for their 175g sugar and would be good for a special treat

I’d love to know how you can successfully substitute for refined sugar in cake/bun recipes, even partly at least. Anyone?

Jill

Mulligatawny and rye bread, why that’s a mouthful!

can't say its name but i like it

From a quick perusal of the BBC food site, Mulligatawny is a fine veggie prospect and there’s lots of recipes out there for it.  However, we’re rather fond of our weekend morning cookery shows round these parts, and it was from Saturday Kitchen that Mark took this particular recipe.  Please ignore the 4 whole quail (!), and the garnishing onion rings.  Does anyone ever do garnishes if they’re cooking for people that live in the same house as them?  I mean, I’d stretch to a bit of chopped parsley or coriander, but life’s too short to deep fry a decorative onion ring.

The path to lunch almost got diverted, as I lifted the lids on the various pans to explore/commandeer activities and spotted some distinctly un-red lentils.   Hardened veggie that I am, and being in possession of a pair of eyes, I know my lentils/colours apart, and despite husbands cries to the contrary, there is certainly NOT a reddish tinge off the green lentils, and if you move the jar of green lentils slightly to the left in the cupboard, you’ll see a bag of bright orangey red lentils not really at all hidden behind it.  Perhaps they cast a hue across the green ones.

Anyway, unintentional ingredient substitutions and omissions aside, this was as dinner of a soup so it was. Atin’ & drinkin’ in it.  The curry powder gave it a lovely kick, softened slightly by a big spoon of natural yogurt stirred into Doms.  It was a good thick texture and excellent grub for spooning by oneself.

We ate it with a Lidl Artisan Rye loaf.  The words ‘Lidl’ & ‘Artisan’ should be an oxymoron, but their newish bakery sections (in some stores) are full of gorgeous treats, from pumpkin seed loafs to gouda rolls, to chocolate croissants.  I could see no loaves over €2, and no pastries over 69c.  They’re baked on the premises and everything we’ve tried so far has been really really good, and far less dependent on white breads compared to other higher end supermarkets (Superquinn I’m looking at you) bakeries.

69c pastries mean 2 each per adult unfortunately.

Jill

Mackerel shmackerel*

*this represents the views of the author.

They ate mackerel fillets there last friday night, the boy and his dad.  I believe mackerel was grilled, some baby new potatoes were steamed and off they went.  I’m also told that fillets don’t have bones in them, that the 3 fillets cost under €3 in Superquinn, and that the smaller boy manages the potatoes easily when quartered.

harumph

I really thought I could convince Dominic’s dad to write the meaty & fishy posts for this blog, but that never came to pass.  Dom isn’t vegetarian, not yet, so I don’t just want to show a one-sided view of what he eats.  But save telling you the facts, I can’t share much else.  I don’t cook it and I won’t, but I do want to help others that are starting off BLW with their kids, or just trying to come up with different ideas for feeding their own families.  So I’ll keep telling you what Dominic eats.  Just don’t expect me to be super happy about it…

Jill